Author Archive

  • Guitar Banjo

    The Guitarbanjo comes from Africa, and became a very popular string instrument in America. It is easy to play and suitable for many music styles. Therefore various sizes and types developed like the Guitarbanjo, the five-stringed Banjo, Ukulelebanjo, Mandolinbanjo and others. The Guitarbanjo has six strings and a large sound box made from metal. Guitarists […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Hammered Dulcimer

    This instrument is found in many forms across Eurasia.  These include the large Hungarian cymbalom, the Chinese yanqin, the Indian santoor, and the Middle Eastern santoor.  It is the forerunner of the piano, and anyone who has looked inside a piano will likely notice the similarities in construction.  In the case of the hammered dulcimer, […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Kantele

    In its classical form, the Finnish Kantele consists of a wooden resonating body in the shape of a wing. The body is made from a specially crafted Birch trunk. Five strings from horse hair tuned in pentatonic scale cover the body. Modern Kanteles can have up to 36 metal strings and offer a system of […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Kinnor

    Kinnor is the hebrew name for an ancient Israelite lyre mentioned in the Bible and commonly translated as 'harp'. Although uncertain, historians of musical instruments say it is similar to the Greek cithara, which was in use among the Semitic peoples. A symbolic representation of the kinnor appears on ancient Hebrew coins. The kinnor has […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Mandola

    As the name suggests, the mandola is related to the mandolin, like the viola to the violin.  The relations in size and tuning definitely are the same as in the violin family.  The mandola originates from the lute and has seen several changes of name and construction.  Nowadays the mandola is not as popular as […]

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  • Mandolin

      Mandolins belong to the family of Guitar-like plucked instruments. Either they have a round body, as is traditional in Southern countries, or a flat one. The latter is quite common in Irish music. We offer both types: there are simple low budget instruments or models of high quality from various brands.

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Morin Khuur

    The Morin Khuur, also known by the name “Horse-head Fiddle”, is the most important musical instrument of Mongolia and considered a symbol of the nation. Its sound is described as expansive like the wind in the grasslands. It also imitates the neighing of the horses that are typical of this country. Therefore the scroll is […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Mountain Dulcimer

    The Appalachian, or mountain dulcimer, first appeared in the homes of Scottish immigrants in the Appalachian mountains.  Beyond this, the etymology of the instrument is unclear, although many theories exist.  It is considered one of the easiest stringed instruments to play.  Generally, the technique is to lie it flat across the lap and pluck or […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Oud

    The Oud is an ancient pear-shaped stringed instrument commonly used in Greek, Byzantine, North African and Middle Eastern music. Construction of the oud is similar to that of the lute. The modern oud and the European lute both descend from a common ancestor via diverging paths but is readily distinguished by its lack of frets […]

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  • Pipa

    The Chinese Pipa belongs to the short neck lutes. Since its development in the Han Dynasty almost 2,000 years ago, it has became a popular solo and concert instrument. People unfamiliar with the instrument may be surprised by the weight when handling one for the first time, as it is solid rather than hollow. On […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Psaltery

    The psaltery likely originated somewhere in the Mediterranean around the time of the Greek empire, and the bowed version pictured above emerged in the 19th century. The strings are played between the pegs with a bow. The chromatic type has 20 strings with a scale from C´ to G´´. On the right side there are […]

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  • Rabab

    The rebab is a type of string instrument so named no later than the 8th century and spread via Islamic trading routes over much of North Africa, the Middle East, parts of Europe, and the Far East although it is particularly synonymous with Afganistan.

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  • Santoor

    The santoor is the earliest form of the hammered dulcimer, generally believed to have originated in Iran.  In a slightly altered form, it is also a very prominant feature of Indian music, and can be found mentioned in early Hindu texts.

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  • Sarangi

    Famous for its incredible adaptability due to the flexible tuning and tonal range, the sarangi is a relatively small bowed instrument from India with three primary gut strings and 35-37 sympathetic metal strings and a wooden body with a skin head stretched over the resonating bowl.

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Sarod

    There are many theories surrounding the origin of this instrument.  One is that it was adapted from an Afghan rabab after an Afghan musician came to India in the 18th century and became the court musician of a king.  Another is that it is the combination of a veena, rubab, and a sursinger.  In either […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Semsemia

    The Semsemia (also spelt Simsimiyya) is a plucked lyre from the Middle Eastern countries of Egypt, Jordan and Yemen. Traditionaliy played by the Bedouin eople as a social instrument, in Egypt the Semsemia is used to accompany song and dance and is known to be particularly synonymous with the cities of Port Said and Ismaïlia. […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Setar

    The setar originated in pre-Islamic Persia and is likely the inspiration behind the modern strum stick.  Although it now has four strings, the name means "three string" (se – three, and tar – string), because up until the 18th century – when a fourth string was added by a prominent player – it did in fact have three […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Shamisen

    The shamisen is one of the most popular and widely played instruments of Japan. As is the case with several other instruments, this lute originates from Chinese string instruments, and began to be used in Japan at the end of the 16th century. The rather small resonating box is mostly covered with skin from cats […]

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  • Sitar

    The Western Hemisphere came into contact with the Indian Sitar via Beatles guitarist George Harrison, who studied under legendary sitarist Ravi Shankar. The Sitar emerged in its modern form in the 18th century during the Moghul empire. 6 or 7 main strings pass over the curved and movable frets while 11 to 13 resonating strings […]

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  • Strum Stick

    Essentially a modern version of the Iranian setar – a very simple and charming strummed instrument that is also easy to take with you on vacation!

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Swardmandal

    The swarmandal or Indian harp is an Indian zither that is today most commonly used as an accompanying instrument for vocal Hindustani classical music of North India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. The name combines swara (notes) and mandal (group), representing its ability to produce a large number of notes; it is also known popularly as Sur-mandal. […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Tar

    A Persian instrument that first appeared in its current form in the 18th century during the reign of the Ottoman Empire.  The name means "string" (which is likely the root of the names of other instruments, such as the guitar and sitar).  It is made from carved wood and lamb skin.  The tar was also the […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sound Therapy,Strings | 0 Comment
  • Tuners

    Various tuners for stringed instruments.

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Uncategorized | 0 Comment
  • Tuning Keys

    We sell universal tuning keys.

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Veena

    There are various types of veena that differ in construction and sound. The most popular form is the Saraswati veena, named for the goddess with which it is associated, whose photo you can see above. The neck and resonating body of high quality are carved from one piece of Jackwood. The upper resonator serves rather […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Strings | 0 Comment
  • Guitar and Travel Guitar and Lap Guitar

    Guitar-like instruments have been in use for over 5,000 years. The name guitar originates from the Spanish language (Guitarra) and was then transferred to German. It reaches back to the old Greek word Kithara which describes a lute instrument of Greek antiquity. Nowadays, it is one of the world's most widespread and recognizable instruments. Certainly […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Children,Strings | 0 Comment
  • Ukulele

    The ukulele is a Hawaiian instrument adapted from guitars brought to the islands by Portuguese immigrants. The name, which roughly translates to “hopping flea”, was possibly inspired by the quick movement of the fingers over the strings. It is considered an excellent instrument to begin learning to strum on, and has an exceptionally sweet and charming […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Children,Strings | 0 Comment
  • Kotamo

    A combination of three instruments – the monochord, koto, and tambura, which comes with a stand to allow easy playing of all three.

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sound Therapy,Strings | 0 Comment
  • Lyre

    The lyre is an instrument that resembles a harp, and it is played mostly with one hand. It belongs to the family of stringed instruments where the strings are not plucked like a harp, but the fingers rather pass gently over them. It is generally regarded as having come from the Mediterranean area, like the […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sound Therapy,Strings | 0 Comment
  • Monochord and Monolini

    The Monochord was developed in Ancient Greece and was used to illustrate mathematical properties of musical pitch, most famously by Pythagoras. The name, meaning “one string” is slightly misleading, as they generally have two or more. If you slowly pass your hands alternately over the strings without a break, you get a long-lasting sound that […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sound Therapy,Strings | 0 Comment
  • Sound Cradle

    The Sound Cradle is a modern therapeutic instrument. Either in lying or sitting position you can enjoy a remarkable sound experience. The solid semi-circular cradle bowl is covered with strings on the sides, 18 strings per side. It is constructed in such a way so as to be used as a cradle, a tunnel, a […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sound Therapy,Strings | 0 Comment
  • Tambura

    A typical instrument in Indian classical music since approximately the 15th century is the tambura or tanpura. Similar in shape to the sitar, the tambura consists of a large round resonating body made from a gourd with a long hollow neck. Most often, the tambura has 4 strings, but models with 5 or even 6 […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sound Therapy,Strings | 0 Comment
  • Harp

    The harp is one of the oldest musical instruments known to mankind, and has been included in innumerable myths and probably originally came from the Mediterranean region, spreading out from there into Europe, Asia, and Africa. It is generally tuned in a simple major scale, often starting with F or C, and many models include […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Children,Sound Therapy,Strings | 0 Comment
  • Bagpipes

    Bagpipes, also called Dudelsack, were most likely invented about 4000 years ago in the Middle East, and were likely brought to Europe by the Romans. Although we associate the remarkable sound of Bagpipes with Scotland or Ireland, this instrument is also played traditionally in many parts of Eurasia. According to the area, the construction and […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Bahu

    Considered to be a wind instrument that everyone can play because it does not require an embouchure, the bahu is a Chinese folk flute that has the appearance of a regular bamboo side blown flute but for the fact that it has a copper reed in the mouth piece. The bahu produces a mellow and […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Bird Whistles

    It is amazing how well our selection of bird whistles recreate the sounds of our avian friends and Gandharva Loka offers a variety of bird whistles. We also stock bird whistles from the Vogel company of France and beautifully decorated bird-shaped ceramic and plastic bird whistles. Some of these hold water in a chamber which, […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Bulb Horns

    Squeeze, or bulb horns have a wide variety of uses and are synonymous with vintage cars, bicycles, clown and busking acts and general good fun. They are typically trumpet shaped instruments of varying shape and size and, as the name implies, use a rubber bulb that, when squeezed, pushes air through a simple metal reed […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Dizi

    A traditional Chinese flute used often in Chinese opera and orchestras. Whereas most simple flutes have only a blowing (embouchure) hole and finger (tone) holes, the dizi has an unique additional hole, known as mo kong in Chinese, between the embouchure and tone holes. A special membrane called dimo, made from an almost tissue-like shaving […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Duduk

    The Duduk originated approximately 5000 years ago in Mesopotamia, and thus it is one of the oldest double reed instruments in the world. The tube made from apricot wood and has 8 holes and 1-2 thumb holes on the back. The remarkable feature of the Duduk is the reed with a length of up to […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Dungchen

    Dungchen (also known as the Tibetan Horn and ) are the great horns of the Tibetan Buddhist monasteries and ensembles. Generally made from brass and ornately decorated, dunchen vary in length from as small as 40 cm up to four or five meters long and are typically constructed in several telescoping sections to accomodate travel […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Fife

    Similar to a tin whistle, the fife is a tin, brass, or nickel transverse flute often used in military marching bands. It has a light, charming sound and is excellent for travel.

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Fujara

    The fujara (pronounced foo-ya-ra) is a large overtone flute that originated in central Slovakia and was traditionally played by shepherds for recreation. It is as a large sophisticated fipple flute of unique design ranging from 150 to 170 cm long and tuned in A, G, and F. A fujara has three tone holes located on […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • HuLuSi

    The word “hulusi” comes from two other Chinese words – “hulu”, meaning gourd, and “si”, meaning “silk”, referring to the instrument’s smooth sound. Originally, it was confined to a small area of China and played by minority ethnic groups. Today, it is played all over China. It is traditionally constructed of a gourd and three […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Kaval

      Kavals are played in Armenia, Turkey, Bulgaria and a few other Eastern European nations, as well as Northern Greece and Azerbaijan, and is primarily associated with Anatolian and Balkan shepherds. The construction and scale of the flutes differ, depending on the country. The narrow tube, between 30 and 80 cm, is often carved from […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Winds | 0 Comment
  • Lotus Flute

    No Vietnamese celebration would be complete without the chirping of simple little Lotus Flutes. But in the West the Lotus flute enjoys great popularity, too. Children love it as well as adults. While blowing, move the plunger up and down to create a smooth and infinitely variable scale. Both models in metal or plastic allow […]

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  • Nagaswaram, Shenai, Bombard, and Zurna

    These wind instruments are played mostly outside at ceremonies and processions all over Eurasia. In Northern India, the nagaswaram is said to be extremely auspicious, and it is also the loudest non brass instrument in the world. In Armenia, the Zurna is related to local Christian beliefs and is used in folk music, as well […]

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  • Ney

    One of the oldest examples of the flute is the Ney; an end blown flute that features prominently in Persian, Turkish, and Arabic music being found in Egypt, Turkey, Iran, Pakistan and parts of north-western India. In some of these musical traditions, it is the only wind instrument used. The kaval belongs to the same […]

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  • Nose Flute

    Believe it or not, this flute is blown with the nose! Place the opening at the thicker end of the flute against the nostrils; the open mouth is placed around the other hole. The flute has to be pressed against nose and lips. Then blow gently through the nose. The mouth creates a resonating chamber […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Children,Winds | 0 Comment
  • Panpipes

    The oldest Pan Pipes were found in 3000-year-old tombs. They were made from bird bones of different lengths, bound together in a row by wax or resin. Generally, they are chromatically tuned. They are named for their association with the Greek god Pan, but are also found in many other parts of the world, such […]

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  • Quena

    The quena is the traditional flute of the Andes. Traditionally made of bamboo, it has 6 finger holes, one thumb hole and is open on both ends. To produce sound, the player closes the top end of the pipe with the flesh between his chin and lower lip, and blows a stream of air downward, […]

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  • Recorder

    The recorder is a similar instrument to the Irish flute, and was very popular in medieval and baroque times. Nowadays, it is often used as a starting instrument for children learning to play winds. It can be found in wood or plastic, and has a charming sound.

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  • Schwegel

    A Schwegel is a simple wooden 6-holed Fife. Another name for it is Seitlpfeife. It is a typical folk music instrument and has an age long tradition, especially in the Salzkammergut (Salzburg area) and Bavaria. They are always played in pairs. The flute is usually tuned in A´, H´, C´ or D´´ but most commonly […]

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  • Shakuhachi

    Traditionally, this end blown flute is made from carefully selected roots of bamboo and was used by the monks of the Fuke school of Zen Buddhism in the practice of suizen (“blowing meditation”). It was introduced to Japan from China in the 8th century. Today, it is one of Japan’s most well-known and popular instruments, […]

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  • Xaphoon

    The Xaphoon was originally made in Hawaii in 1972 by saxophonist Brian Wittman with the intent of creating an instrument for a child who liked the sound of the saxophone. It can be used to play music written for a saxophone, clarinet, or chalumeau and is constructed of either bamboo or plastic.

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  • Howling Tube

    It´s not only fun for kids! The Howling Tube also offers sophisticated effects while improvising or in group work. These plastic tubes with Accordion-like structure are very easy to play: Hold one end of the tube tightly with one hand and start spinning it around. By changing the speed of spinning you can create lower […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Children,Winds | 0 Comment
  • Kazoo

    The Kazoo is a simple musical instrument that everyone can play. you sing into the wider opening your own voice causes a vellum membrane to vibrate. It produces a saxophone like sound like when blowing on a comb The Kazoo originates from the Mirliton, a traditional African instrument. In the Middle Ages, a different form […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Children,Winds | 0 Comment
  • Kid’s Flute

    A flute for children has to be solid and suitable for small fingers. Plus, it should be made from a natural material and pleasant for the ear. These children´s flutes made by workshops in Leipzig, Germany, and in Hungary fulfill all those demands. They have a simple but appealing design and are inexpensive. The flutes […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Children,Winds | 0 Comment
  • Tin Whistle

    The Tin Whistle is the wind instrument heard typically in Irish folk music. It is a simple end blown flute from the fipple whistle family, which could possibly date back as far as 83,000 years. Originally made from tin, nowadays it is made from materials such as plastic, nickel and brass. The flute has 6 […]

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  • Ocarina

    The Ocarina (Italian for “little goose”) is a wind instrument from baked or dried clay. It was used by many ancient cultures such as the Mayas, Incas and Aztecs, as well as the Chinese, and is part of a family of instruments that dates back approximately 12,000 years. Nowadays the Ocarina is famous thanks to […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Children,Made in Canada,Winds | 0 Comment
  • Aeolian Harp

    In the 19th Century, similar instruments to the one above became popula in many parks and homes of Germany, England and Scotland. It was called Äolsharfe ― Harp of Äolus. Similar instruments existed much earlier than the 19th century in East Asia. The ever changing melodies produced by the wind are extremely charming, and these […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Chimes,Sound Therapy,Winds | 0 Comment
  • First Nations Flute

    It is most likely that this flute was originally of Anasazi origin and spread throughout North America. Early models have been found of river cane, but the flute is primarily made of hardwood. The traditional scale is pentatonic, but a sixth note is included in most models which can be used to produce more variation.

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Made in Canada,Winds | 0 Comment
  • Overtone Flute

    The Overtone Flute is a very old instrument from Scandanavia and Russia whose special sound and range had a great influence on Folk music. To play, simply blow softly to get low notes and with more force to get higher notes.

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Sound Therapy,Winds | 0 Comment
  • Bansuri

    Originally, the bansuri flute a folk instrument whose history was very closely linked to the mythology of India, but in the last century, it has also become a prominent fixture in classical music and is now played . It is made of bamboo cane and is available in a wide ranger of sizes and keys, […]

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  • Didgeridoo

    Traditionally, the Australian didgeridoo is made of eucalyptus wood, which has been allowed to be hollowed out by termites. A mouthpiece made of beeswax is then affixed to the end to allow players to adjust the size to suit themselves. Although it is impossible to deduce its exact age, archaeological studies suggest that the indigenous […]

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  • Single Wu Wei

    Similar to the chimes on a frame, these can be either played with a mallet or placed close together and allowed to chime against one another.

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  • Single chimes on frames

    Finely tuned rods, which can be played with a mallet and produce a lovely deep sound.

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  • Tree works

      These chimes are appropriate for performing artists, and are handmade in Tennessee – various shapes and sizes are available, and professional performers will not be disappointed by their quality.

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Chimes,Percussion,Sound Therapy | 0 Comment
  • Saltspring Island Chimes

    These lovely chimes are made locally on Saltspring Island, and come in a variety of colours, as well as sizes and tunings.

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  • Zaphir

    Very sweet, small chimes from France, which are made to be soft, unobtrusive, and enjoyable. The Zaphir chimes are made of beautifull painted paper and plastic and are perfect for enjoying in the home.  

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  • Wu Wei

    Very likely the best chimes in the world. Each rod is tuned so finely that they are generally only completed in four days. They are tuned to the fourth overtone – meaning that not only is the basic note tuned, but the resonance that it produces is tuned as well.

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  • Woodstock

    Creative and many shaped chimes made in New York. They are made of shell, brass, bronze, nickel, copper, bamboo, semi-precious stones, and ceramic.

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  • Door Harp

    The door harp originates in Finland. Traditionally, it hangs at the door to offer the guest a harmonious sound while entering or leaving.

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  • Clap Eggs

    The clap egg is a simple form of novelty castanet. A split egg-shaped wooden block, decorated with the features of an animal or insect, is mounted on a 15 cm stick. When shaken the two halves of the wooden block come together offering a mellow clapping sound. Well made and brightly decorated, these cute clap […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Children | 0 Comment
  • Djembe

    The djembe is probably the most well-known African drum. It was originally used by the Maninke people of western Africa, where it is played at a vast number of social gatherings, such as marriages, funerals, and as an accompaniment to story tellers. They are traditionally carved out of a single piece of hardwood, and have […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Drums | 0 Comment
  • Dhol

    The dhol is a drum widely used throughout India but is especially popular in the Punjab region and particularly so among the Sikhs of East Punjab. It was used in war by the Sikhs and later to celebrate successful harvests. The dhol is most commonly associated with Punjabi music and dance and has remained very […]

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  • Dholak

    The dholak is a very popular folk drum of northern India that is also found in Pakistan and Nepal. It is barrel shaped with a degree of tapering at each end. It has a simple membrane on the right end and a single membrane with a special application (a mixture of tar, clay and sand […]

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  • Ghatam

    The ghatam is a percussion instrument of South India – an earthenware pot that is played using the fingers, thumbs, palms and heels of the hand to strike the outer surface of the ghatam. It has a huge variety of sounds. An airy low-pitch bass sound, called gumki, is created by hitting the mouth of […]

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  • Kanjira

    The kanjira (also known as a ganjira) is a South Indian frame drum – a percussion instrument of the tambourine family. It is used primarily in concerts of Carnatic music (South Indian classical music) as a supporting instrument for the mridanga. Having been used for less than a century, the kanjira is considered to be […]

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  • Khol

    The khol is actually a clay mridanga – a two-sided drum used in northern and eastern India as accompaniment to devotional, folk and Indian semi-classical music. The khol's origins are generally considered to be the area of West Bengal, India. One end of the khol is much smaller than the other in order to give variation to the sound, […]

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  • Mridanga

    The mridanga is a percussion instrument from India. Of ancient origin, it is the primary rhythmic accompaniment in the Carnatic music (South Indian classical music) ensembles and is often accompanied by the ghatam, kanjira, and the mouth harp. The word mridanga is derived from the two Sanskrit words 'Mrid' (clay or earth) and 'Ang' (body). […]

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  • Naal

    The naal (also known as Dholki) is a drum that is very popular with the tamasha tradition (a folk art form which includes singing and dancing) of Maharashtra state in western India. The naal has a barrel shaped body and the left side resembles the bayan (the large metal drum of the tabla) except that […]

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  • Pakhawaj

    The pakhawaj (also known as Mardal, Pakhavaj, Pakuaj, Pakhvaj, Pakavaj or Mardala) is an Indian barrel-shaped two-headed drum. The North Indian equivalent to the Southern mridanga, it also has many similarities to the dholak. It is the standard percussion instrument in the dhrupad style and is widely used as an accompaniment for various forms of […]

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  • Pandariq

    The pandariq, or riq (also spelt riqq or rik) is a type of tambourine that is common to Arabic music and is an important percussion instrument in both folk and classical music. Traditionally the riq has a wooden frame, metal jingles (small cymbals), and a thin head made of fish or goat skin. These days […]

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  • Pandeiro

    This very popular typical Brazilian Bell Drum is mostly heard in Samba and Capoeira, the fighting game of Brazil. Its origin is in the Arabian area though. In a solid frame made of plastic or wood there are a couple of flat metal plates fixed in pairs, whose size and quality fundamentally influence the sound. […]

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  • Sticks

    We offer a wide variety of drum sticks for various types of drums.

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  • Tabla

    The tabla is a popular Indian percussion instrument used in Hindustani classical music and in popular and devotional music of the Indian subcontinent. The instrument consists of a pair of hand drums of contrasting yet complimentary sizes and timbres. The term tabla is derived from an Arabic word tabl which simply means drum. Playing technique […]

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  • Table Drum

    The Table Drum is used successfully in all kinds of therapy (music, linguistic, psychic therapy) and rhythmical-musical education. Its strong and deep frequencies bring most people down to earth, giving them a balanced feeling. The powerful vibrations are especially felt in the lower parts of the body. The Table Drum can easily be played by […]

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  • Taiko

    Japanese taiko drums (taiko in modern times is a general term for 'drum' but historically taiko meant 'great' or 'wide drum' in Japanese) have been developed into a wide range of percussion instruments that are used in both Japanese folk and classical musical traditions. Taiko drumming has been part of Japanese culture for many centuries […]

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  • Water Drum

    The surprisingly warm and sonorous bass sounds make the Water Drum a fascinating instrument with an amazing effect. The larger bowl of a pair is filled with water, the smaller one is laid on the water upside down. Now you can drum on it whether it be with hands or soft strikers. If you have suitable […]

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  • Zarb

    The zarb (also known as tonbak, tombak, donbak or dombak) is a goblet drum that originated during the Persian empire (ancient Iran/Iraq). It is considered the principal percussion instrument of Persian music. The Persian frame drum, known as the Daf, was for many centuries the favoured drum of the Persian court while the zarb was […]

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  • Bongos

    The Bongo comes from Cuba. They are made from wood, fibreglass, other plastic, or even clay. Most Bongos are tuneable using a special system which is similar to that of a Conga. The player holds the drum tightly between the knees while the bigger drum is close to the dominant hand. Usually one plays the […]

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  • Lolipop Drum

    A plastic kid's drum available in three sizes, which comes with a mallot.

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  • Gong Accessories

    We have various gong stands in metal and in wood and in various shapes, as well as mallets in various sizes and materials.

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  • Djun-Djun

    The talking drum, dundun, or djun-djun is a set of three drums that originated in the West African empire of Mali. The three drums that make up a djun-djun set are the dundoumba (literally meaning 'big djun-djun'), which has the lowest tone and is the largest of the three. Next is the mid-tone, medium-sized sangban […]

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  • Gong Drum

    A gong drum (also known as 'gong bass drum') is a percussion instrument that has a large single or double sided drumhead in order to create a powerful, resonant sound when struck. The head can be tuned as loose as possible to avoid any sense of pitch in the sound, or tensioned more tightly to […]

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  • Ocean Drum

    The ocean drum really allows you to bring the sound of the sea into your music. Using small metal beads inside a double sided frame drum, the ocean drum allows you to create wonderful ocean wave effects as you tilt the drum from one side to the other. The ocean drum can also be used […]

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  • Spring Drum

    A simple instrument, in terms of construction, the thunder drum is a resonating tube with a drum skin attached to one end. Through this skin is connected a long spring, which when being played hangs down from the bottom of the instrument. By shaking the instrument from side to side we create wonderful thunder effects […]

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  • Talking Drum

    Talking drums (known by many names including Dundun, Gangan, Dondo, Odondo, Lunna, Donno, Kalangu, Doodo, Tama, Tamanin and Ekwe) are a member of the hourglass shaped family of pressure drums and are one of the oldest instruments in West Africa. Their history can be traced back to the Ghana empire. The talking drum is particularly […]

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  • Udu

    The native inhabitants of Africa (in this case, Nigeria) discovered once upon a time that their storage jugs produced interesting sounds. The Udu (pronounced Oodoo) was born of this discovery and refined into its modern form. Nowadays it was played in ceremonies and for dancing. But clay jugs are used for music in other countries, […]

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  • Shaman Drum

    Shaman drums are integral to Shamanistic cultures all over the world. In their most recognizable form, the drum is essentially a solid wooden frame is covered with a thick animal skin. Ropes made of skin or sinews hold the skins to the frame and allow the drum to be held in the back. Depending on […]

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    Posted at July 20, 2013 | By : | Categories : Drums,Made in Canada,Sound Therapy | 0 Comment
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